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Posts for category: Child Health Care

By Children's Medical Clinics
March 10, 2020
Category: Child Health Care
Tags: Preventive Care  

Well-child visits, or regular checkups, offer parents crucial details about the emotional, social, and physical development and growth of their child. These regular appointments also provide parents the chance to obtain relevant advice and ask questions pertinent to their child’s wellbeing. According to the American Academy of Pediatrics, once children become one-year-olds, they should have regular visits with their pediatrician every three months until they are two years old, every six months until they’re two and a half years old, and at least once yearly when they turn six years old, even if they’re not sick.

Here at Children’s Medical Clinics in Kaufman, TX, we ensure that each well-child visit under the care of our pediatrician, Dr. C. Turner Lewis III, is comfortable and productive for you and your child.

What to Expect During a Well-Child Checkup

During each well-child checkup, your pediatrician will take specific measurements and give vaccinations based on your child’s vaccination schedule. Screenings will also be performed whenever needed. Weight and height will be checked, and the circumference of your child’s head will also be measured until he or she reaches 36 months old. Starting at three years old, blood pressure will likewise be measured at every checkup.

Your pediatrician will also monitor your child’s developmental progression and compare it to the last checkup’s results. For instance, your pediatrician may ask whether your 18-month-old kid has started talking or whether your five or six-year-old child has started reading. Further, your pediatrician will ask about your child’s behavior to determine if their behavior is age-appropriate. It is immensely vital to discuss these types of development and behavioral issues so that you can work together to develop appropriate solutions to these issues.

In addition, your pediatrician in Kaufman, TX, will likewise conduct a thorough physical exam. Aside from checking your child’s heart, abdomen, lungs, spine, genitals, head, eyes, neck, arms, nose, ears, mouth, and legs, your pediatrician may also ask your child to do certain tasks. For example, your child may be asked to run or walk to test their gross motor skills and manipulate tiny objects using their hands to test fine motor skills.
 

Tome For a Checkup? Give Us a Call

To schedule your child’s well-child checkup with our pediatrician, Dr. C. Turner Lewis III, call us at Children’s Medical Clinics in Kaufman, TX, at (972) 932-1319. We also serve the Dallas and Rockwell counties.

By Children's Medical Clinics
February 19, 2020
Category: Child Health Care
Tags: Sport   Physical  

Also called pre-participation physicals, sports physicals are an excellent way to guarantee that your child or teenager is healthy enough to participate in recreational activities at school or the local park district. Here at Children's Medical Clinics, our pediatricians deliver compassionate care to those living in the counties of Dallas and Rockwall. Read on or schedule an appointment at one of our Kaufman, TX, offices to learn more about the benefits of sports physicals.

Why Does My Child Need a Sports Physical?

To avoid getting sick or hurt out on the field, track, or court, your child can benefit from an annual sports physical. These meetings allow your pediatrician to log any changes or injuries, as well as help your athlete identify and deal with problems that might interfere with their favorite sport. Your doctor can also provide training tips and advice for avoiding injuries.

What Happens During the Exam?

Our pediatrician encourages you to bring your child's medical records to your initial consultation, as well as immunization copies, a list of allergies, and any medications that they are currently taking. The school may also require specific documentation, so be sure not to forget them before arriving. Once the doctor finishes assessing individual and family health history, they may ask questions about prior surgeries, hospitalizations, or suspicious symptoms, such as difficulty breathing or chest pain.

Call Us Today to Schedule an Appointment at one of our Dallas/Rockwall County Locations

If your child is planning on playing sports this year, consult with a pediatrician here at Children's Medical Clinic to receive unparalleled education and care. We can provide peace of mind, before, during, and after your visit. For more information about sports physicals, conditions we treat, and the services we provide, visit our website. To schedule an appointment at one of our offices in the counties of Dallas and Rockwall, dial (972) 932-1319 today.

By Children's Medical Clinics
May 02, 2018
Category: Child Health Care
Tags: Eye Problems  

When your little one is first born they will go through a series of tests and screenings to make sure they are healthy. This includes checking theirEye Problems vital signs, hearing, and vision. Your child’s first battery of health screenings will occur while you are still in the hospital. If everything checks out just fine then you’ll be good to go until you need to visit the pediatrician in the coming week. Of course, if we discover that there is an issue with their vision you may need to visit your child’s pediatrician sooner.

Of course, not all pediatric eye problems occur at birth. They can also happen as your child continues to develop over the years. This is why it’s so important that you are visiting your pediatric doctor regularly to ensure that if there is a problem with your child’s vision that they get the proper care they need to prevent more serious issues from happening.

Here are just some of the most common eye problems that children face:

  • Nystagmus: A condition that causes involuntary and repetitive eye movements, which results in a reduction in vision.

  • Strabismus: Sometimes referred to as crossed eyes, this is when the eyes are not aligned with one another.

  • Amblyopia: Colloquially referred to as a “lazy eye”, this condition occurs when vision is one eye doesn’t develop properly, resulting in reduced vision.

  • Congenital cataract: While most people associate cataracts with older individuals, it is possible for a child to be born with this condition that causes clouding of the ocular lens.

Some eye problems can be caught at birth; however, it’s important to understand that babies aren’t born with all of their visual capabilities. This is something that is learned over time as their eyes continue to develop and send signals to their brain. A baby’s vision isn’t as clear as ours; however, in the first few months, you’ll begin to see them focus on objects close up, develop eye-hand coordination as they grab for things they want or follow moving objects.

Of course, you will have a pediatrician schedule to follow, which ensures that your little one is getting the proper care, checkups, vaccinations, and screenings they need to check off certain developmental milestones. If your pediatrician detects vision problems they will most likely refer you to a pediatric eye doctor who can provide you with the best treatment options.

If at any time you become worried about your child’s vision, then it’s important that you make an appointment with your pediatrician to have their vision tested. Your pediatrician is here to make sure that your growing child gets the care they need throughout the course of their developing life so they can become a healthy, happy adult.

By Children's Medical Clinics
April 13, 2018
Category: Child Health Care
Tags: Childhood Obesity  

Childhood ObesityMore and more, childhood obesity is becoming prevalent in the U.S. According to the American Academy of Pediatrics, over the past two decades it has doubled in children and tripled among teens.

Obesity during childhood is a serious matter that can lead to medical problems, including diabetes, asthma, sleep apnea and high blood pressure. Additionally, being overweight can also take an emotional toll on kids, leading to depression and low self-esteem brought on by various psychological stresses.

As a parent, you should play an important role in encouraging your child to make important changes to help them lose weight and overcome obesity. Ask your pediatrician for support in guiding your child toward an overall healthier lifestyle.

Incremental Lifestyle Changes Starting at Home

Kids who are overweight or obese need guidance from their parents to make healthier lifestyle choices. These changes start at home and include eating better and exercising. Involve the entire family in your child’s efforts to lose weight, supporting him by setting good examples and modeling healthy eating behaviors that you want him to adopt both now and into adulthood.

  • Be a good role model, leading the way to a healthy lifestyle by eating healthy and staying active.
  • Remove unhealthy temptations from the home and gradually introduce healthier foods into your child’s diet over a period of time.
  • Prepare meals that are rich in vegetables, fruits and whole-grains, and limit consumption of foods high in sugar and saturated fats.
  • Allow your child to participate in preparing the family meals to learn the benefits of cooking at home.
  • Limit the amount of time your child can spend watching television playing video games or using the computer.
  • Incorporate exercise into your child’s daily routine, which can include a wide range of activities such as walking the dog, raking leaves, swimming, playing tag or washing the car.

Talk to Your Pediatrician

Your child’s pediatrician can also play an important role in monitoring your child’s weight gain starting from age one, helping to make sure it remains within normal guidelines as he grows. If the pediatrician suspects a weight problem, they can discuss it with you and your child, and then help you prioritize the changes that need to be made to manage the child’s weight. YOur pediatrician can work with you to help you set health goals and make the necessary lifestyle changes such as improving diet and becoming more physically active starting at home.

By Children's Medical Clinics
April 03, 2018
Category: Child Health Care
Tags: Sore Throats  

Child with Sore ThroatIn infants, toddlers and preschoolers, the most frequent cause of sore throats is a viral infection. No specific medicine is required when a virus is responsible, and the child should get better over a seven to ten day period. During this period, your child may develop a fever, but they generally are not very sick. 

It is not uncommon to experience a sore throat when your child has a cold or the flu. Unfortunately, there are other reasons for sore throats to develop that may be symptomatic of more serious problems.  Children tend to have sore throats more often than adolescents or adults, with sore throats being the most common during the winter months when upper respiratory infections are more frequent. 

The major cause of a sore throat is an infection, whether it is viral or bacterial, and can also be caused by allergies and environmental conditions. If your child has a sore throat that lasts longer than the typical five to seven day duration of a cold or flu, and is not associated with an avoidable allergy or irritation, it is important to contact your local pediatrician. The following are signs and symptoms to alert you to take your child to the pediatrician:

  • Severe and prolonged sore throat
  • Difficulty breathing
  • Difficulty swallowing
  • Difficulty opening the mouth
  • Joint pain
  • Earache
  • Rash
  • Fever that is over 101 degrees
  • Frequent recurring sore throat
  • Lump in the neck
  • Hoarseness lasting over two weeks

At the first onset of a sore throat it is always important to monitor the progress and recognize any other symptoms that may accompany the sore throat, which could cause it to worsen into strep throat, inflamed tonsils, or laryngitis. Contact your pediatrician if your child is experiencing a sore throat that won’t go away. Your pediatrician will help diagnose and treat your child’s symptoms.